Pouring Polymer onto TRIRIGA docs


Google Polymer! What am I talking about? First, let me ask you this: Have you ever designed your own websites in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript? Or edited your own blog posts and switched from rich-text view to HTML view? In any case, if you’re a technical writer or developer, you’re probably familiar with HTML tags — tags like [a], [div], [img], and [p] — the basic building blocks of traditional HTML.

But what if a new web standard emerged where HTML tags were no longer the basic building blocks? What if the new building blocks were widget-like components that rendered visual effects in a single custom tag or attribute that formerly required dozens or hundreds of tags and attributes? This is where Web Components step in, a new set of W3C standards being developed by Google.

Polymer Topeka Demo

Polymer Topeka Demo

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. Next, let me ask: Where does Polymer step in? Based on these Web Components standards, Polymer is a growing library of pre-built reusable components also being developed by Google. Can you imagine a sliding or rippling tap effect added to your app with a single custom tag, instead of dozens of traditional tags?
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Mixing TRIRIGA with Bluemix and IoT


TRIRIGA remixed? With Bluemix and IoT? How? Well, let’s figure it out together. If you haven’t heard, probably the biggest IoT news in the last few weeks was the IBM announcement that it “will invest $3 billion over the next four years to establish a new Internet of Things (IoT) unit, and that it is building a cloud-based open platform designed to help clients and ecosystem partners build IoT solutions.”

What does “cloud-based open platform” remind me of? You guessed it: Bluemix. In fact, the news named a future offering called the IBM Bluemix IoT Zone where developers could “enrich existing business applications – such as enterprise asset management, facilities management, and software engineering design tools”. What is our “facilities management” application? You guessed it: TRIRIGA.

Potential future of TRIRIGA, Bluemix, and IoT

Potential future of TRIRIGA, Bluemix, and IoT

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. While it might be more direct to share my impressions from within our new IoT division, it might be more fun to show how a passing but perceptive observer outside IBM might figure out where TRIRIGA fits into the mix. After all, both perspectives might turn out to be similar. I might even learn more about what’s going on!
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Tackling stacks of Korean paperbacks


More Korean! Wow, has 3 months flown by already? 진짜? (Chincha? Really?) If you don’t know, back in January, I started to learn Korean. Well, since my initial weeks of reading, writing, and typing in the Hangul alphabet, I’ve expanded my learning to conversational speaking lessons. Although the Pimsleur audio method might not fit everyone’s style, I love that I can listen and speak while driving!

Interestingly, while I didn’t plan it this way, January focused on identifying the Hangul symbols, February focused on recognizing and pronouncing the subtle Korean sounds, and March finally led to associating or linking the two. Naturally, linking sounds-to-symbols and symbols-to-sounds meant getting more books. Not e-books or Kindle books, but real books made of paper. Yup, imagine that!

Korean paperbacks

Korean paperbacks

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. But you might be asking: Why not electronic? If you’re a developer, why did it naturally mean physical books? Actually, it’s simple. If you’ve ever done research for a term paper, a short story, or in this case, a foreign language, the fastest way to compare a half dozen resources at once is to flip through printed books, isn’t it?
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Cracking into the Korean language


Korean! Guess what? On January 3, I started learning a new language. But wait! In my September 7 post about hacking the API Matrix, wasn’t I supposed to be learning a “real” programming language like Python? Yep, that’s true. But as I predicted, “it’s also entirely possible that I might be… distracted by yet another inspiring concept or connection of concepts.” This time, the new language is Korean.

Why Korean? Well, whether it’s my ongoing attachment to Korean pop culture, Japanese anime, Chinese cinema, or Thai cuisine, maybe I’m exhibiting my innate affinity, curiosity, or empathy with Asian things. So why not Japanese? Honestly, while I’ve been fascinated by Japanese anime much longer than Korean cinema or drama, the undeniable deciding factor is my addiction to K-pop music!

Hangul keyboard stickers

Hangul keyboard stickers

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. If you haven’t noticed it, my blog profile states “K-pop geek”. But you might wonder: What does learning Korean have to do with information development? Or technology in general? To be clear, that’s not the reason I’m learning it. But if it was, can you deny the technological impact of Korean conglomerates like Samsung and LG?
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Shocking myself with Casio G-Shock


Casio G-Shock! Did I get a shocking smartwatch for Christmas? Not really. Instead, I discovered a smarter watch choice for myself — an analog-digital watch with actual mechanical gears. In other words, a real watch! Why is it smarter for me? Why is it real to me? Because it stands on its own two feet, or in this case, its own two hands. Why should my watch necessarily remind me of my phone?

In our current era of socio-mobile technology, it’s so easy to become hypnotized, mesmerized, and inspired by the vision of connecting everything to the latest technological center of our lives — our smartphones. In fact, until recently, I myself was drawn to the idea of buying a Pebble smartwatch to connect to my Samsung smartphone. It sounded pretty cool. Until I rediscovered analog watches.

Casio G-Shock GA200RG

Casio G-Shock GA200RG

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. My last analog watch was a black metal Fossil Arkitekt bought in 2008. Despite its sleek elegant style, I wore it less often since my first P90X extreme workouts in 2010. I wore it even less since my first Samsung smartphone in late 2012. But 2 years later, I finally found a Casio G-Shock solution for “elegant, rugged, smart, and real”.
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Feeding the frenzy for TRIRIGA feeds


Long time, no TRIRIGA! While I haven’t discussed TRIRIGA much since my bouncing IBM design post or included it in a blog title since my splitting IBM TRIRIGA post, I’ve experimented with socio-mobile brainstorms to reimagine TRIRIGA information delivery ever since my killing XML post last year. Now, following the successful spark of a colleague’s TRIRIGA Flipboard magazine, I’ve a new brainstorm!

I’ve recently wondered, “Why don’t I open Flipboard as often as Twitter?” Then I realized that despite its striking visual layout, Flipboard flips are not as quickly or easily digestible as Twitter streams. But maybe that’s the point. If I’m scanning with my smartphone, 12 articles flipped on Flipboard might take 6 to 12 finger swipes, while the same 12 articles tweeted on Twitter might take only 3 or 4 swipes.

TRIRIGAFEEDIA @ WordPress

TRIRIGAFEEDIA @ WordPress

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. I admit, we don’t need a Twitter presence that simply duplicates our Flipboard. But then my brainstorm struck! Why not build a WordPress presence that collects tedious-to-search articles then streams them as more visible posts? In turn, why not feed this WordPress stream into a Twitter stream? Voila, TRIRIGAFEEDIA!
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Descending into the DevLearn Expo


DevLearn 2014! Last month, during our local STC Southern Nevada Chapter meeting, I heard about the DevLearn 2014 Conference & Expo for the first time. But the best part? The Expo would be free! The following week, I learned that the event revolves around eLearning technologies and techniques, and the free Expo would take place on October 29 and 30 at the Bellagio, Las Vegas. So I registered!

What does eLearning have to do with technical communication or content strategy? More than I initially expected. As I browsed through the schedules for the three Expo stages — eLearning Tools, Emerging Tech, and Management Xchange — I was amazed by the range of presentations covering interactive video, responsive design, experience design, mobile learning, and social learning. Wow!

DevLearn 2014

DevLearn 2014

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. Although my topic-based authoring tools at work are restricted to Arbortext Editor and Oxygen XML Author, my socio-mobile explorations — whether they are social-media articles, technology webinars, or trade conferences — still make DITA-XML look like a dying standard. What did I discover at DevLearn? Let’s take a peek.
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