Blinding minds with technocratic IoT


Red-pilled! Did the 2016 US Presidential landslide by Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton open your political eyes? For many, it inevitably did. If so, you might’ve been further “red-pilled” or awakened by other globalist technopolitical realities like: (1) IBM had leased its Hollerith punched-card machine to Nazi Germany, and (2) mathematical flaws have exaggerated global-warming models for decades.

In my previous post, I wondered: “Not only is technopolitics a technological form of political action, it might also be a political form of technological action.” This concept strongly applies to the Hollerith tabulator technology, and loosely applies to the global-warming calculations rather than any direct carbon-creating technology. But, along these lines, what about the technocratic Internet of Things?

Technocratic IoT

Technocratic IoT

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. In fact, IBM TRIRIGA falls under the IBM Watson Internet of Things (IoT) business unit. So it’s hard to avoid any IoT news. But as IoT struggles with smart homes, driverless vehicles, and security attacks, one big question always lurks in the shadows: When will globalist technological elites exploit IoT to regulate your freedoms?
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Firing Ctrl-Alt-Delete at the Alt-Right


Google blocksFacebook biasesTwitter bans? Unless you’re blissfully bypassing the United States political controversies — from TPP to ICANN — you’ve probably seen the headlines highlighting the unified liberal-minded suppression of conservative-minded free speech on social media. But imagine the opposite. What if you were witnessing the unified conservative suppression of liberal free speech?

In other words, once you realize that the technopolitical suppression of ideas is happening in one direction, you might also realize that it opens the door to suppression of all opposing directions. But here’s the twist. What if today’s political reality is no longer about liberal versus conservative values? What if it’s about globalist-and-elitist oppression versus nationalist-and-populist self-determination?

Ctrl-Alt-Right

Ctrl-Alt-Right

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. I’ve been using Google, Facebook, and Twitter for years. You probably have too. While filtering sexual and violent content makes sense, what if these same global Internet corporations censored your emails, posts, or tweets for being too “fascist”, “racist”, or “sexist” for their politics? Because it’s already happening in America.
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Corrupting the Internet through ICANN


Americanism vs. Globalism! I think it’s safe to say that many Americans don’t care about global trade politics like the controversial TPP deal, even if it hits their jobs. But what about global Internet politics that could disrupt free speech across the web? What if global trade politics and web politics are so corruptibly intertwined? What if China could influence or suppress Internet traffic as far as the US?

In just another month, on 30 September 2016, the United States will give up its direct oversight of ICANN. Now, because TPP was designed to “pull” the Pacific Rim economies further away from China, it’s no longer so remote to imagine a scenario where China is tempted in retaliation to “push” its own authoritarian policy across the Internet through a more-corruptible “multi-stakeholder” ICANN model.

ICANN

ICANN

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. Last time, I admitted that I “never expected to write a political post”. I guess one time wasn’t enough! This time, extending the logic that TPP favors multinational corporations over sovereign nations, couldn’t Chinese corporations exert the same backroom political control over ICANN, despite “multi-stakeholder” cooperation?
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Investigating the IBM approval of TPP


Batman vs. Superman! Democrat vs. Republican! This year, 2016, has without doubt witnessed a lot of battles — cinematic, political, and ideological. So why not post something a little bit different? This time, I’ll talk about IBM vs. TPP. Or more accurately, IBM’s support of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), and Trade in Services Agreement (TISA).

To save time, I’ll focus on TPP. So what is TPP? According to Wikipedia“The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)… is a trade agreement among twelve Pacific Rim countries [which aims to]… promote economic growth; support the creation and retention of jobs… raise living standards; reduce poverty…” But do these noble goals help the sovereign nations? Or the multinational corporations that defy them?

TPP, TTIP & TISA

TPP, TTIP & TISA

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. I never expected to write a political post. After all, I’ve avoided politics for the last two presidential cycles. So what changed this cycle? Good question. Maybe I’m beginning to see that this isn’t about Democrats vs. Republicans, but about Globalism vs. Americanism. And as my multinational employer, IBM is supporting globalism.
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Tackling stacks of Korean paperbacks


More Korean! Wow, has 3 months flown by already? 진짜? (Chincha? Really?) If you don’t know, back in January, I started to learn Korean. Well, since my initial weeks of reading, writing, and typing in the Hangul alphabet, I’ve expanded my learning to conversational speaking lessons. Although the Pimsleur audio method might not fit everyone’s style, I love that I can listen and speak while driving!

Interestingly, while I didn’t plan it this way, January focused on identifying the Hangul symbols, February focused on recognizing and pronouncing the subtle Korean sounds, and March finally led to associating or linking the two. Naturally, linking sounds-to-symbols and symbols-to-sounds meant getting more books. Not e-books or Kindle books, but real books made of paper. Yup, imagine that!

Korean paperbacks

Korean paperbacks

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. But you might be asking: Why not electronic? If you’re a developer, why did it naturally mean physical books? Actually, it’s simple. If you’ve ever done research for a term paper, a short story, or in this case, a foreign language, the fastest way to compare a half dozen resources at once is to flip through printed books, isn’t it?
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Cracking into the Korean language


Korean! Guess what? On January 3, I started learning a new language. But wait! In my September 7 post about hacking the API Matrix, wasn’t I supposed to be learning a “real” programming language like Python? Yep, that’s true. But as I predicted, “it’s also entirely possible that I might be… distracted by yet another inspiring concept or connection of concepts.” This time, the new language is Korean.

Why Korean? Well, whether it’s my ongoing attachment to Korean pop culture, Japanese anime, Chinese cinema, or Thai cuisine, maybe I’m exhibiting my innate affinity, curiosity, or empathy with Asian things. So why not Japanese? Honestly, while I’ve been fascinated by Japanese anime much longer than Korean cinema or drama, the undeniable deciding factor is my addiction to K-pop music!

Hangul keyboard stickers

Hangul keyboard stickers

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. If you haven’t noticed it, my blog profile states “K-pop geek”. But you might wonder: What does learning Korean have to do with information development? Or technology in general? To be clear, that’s not the reason I’m learning it. But if it was, can you deny the technological impact of Korean conglomerates like Samsung and LG?
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Shocking myself with Casio G-Shock


Casio G-Shock! Did I get a shocking smartwatch for Christmas? Not really. Instead, I discovered a smarter watch choice for myself — an analog-digital watch with actual mechanical gears. In other words, a real watch! Why is it smarter for me? Why is it real to me? Because it stands on its own two feet, or in this case, its own two hands. Why should my watch necessarily remind me of my phone?

In our current era of socio-mobile technology, it’s so easy to become hypnotized, mesmerized, and inspired by the vision of connecting everything to the latest technological center of our lives — our smartphones. In fact, until recently, I myself was drawn to the idea of buying a Pebble smartwatch to connect to my Samsung smartphone. It sounded pretty cool. Until I rediscovered analog watches.

Casio G-Shock GA200RG

Casio G-Shock GA200RG

Hi, my name is Jay, and I’m an IBM TRIRIGA information developer at IBM. My last analog watch was a black metal Fossil Arkitekt bought in 2008. Despite its sleek elegant style, I wore it less often since my first P90X extreme workouts in 2010. I wore it even less since my first Samsung smartphone in late 2012. But 2 years later, I finally found a Casio G-Shock solution for “elegant, rugged, smart, and real”.
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